Creative Spaces (Audrey Daybook)

Many of us dream about working from home – sitting at our desk in our pyjamas, only having to commute down the hallway or garden path.

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The Original Plant Eaters (Daily Care)

The rise of vegetarianism and veganism in recent years has made it easier than ever to follow a plant-based diet. Tofu, tempeh and a whole bunch of milks that didn’t come from a cow are readily available at supermarkets, and even the most far-flung pubs and restaurants usually have at least one non-meat eating option.

With plant eaters being spoilt for choice these days, spare a thought for the original vegetarians, who couldn’t chuck a tub of Tofutti into their shopping basket or fry up a dish of mock meats.

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Breaking Bad Grammar (Pretty Neat)

The rules of the English language can seem as iron-clad as Margaret Thatcher. When we learn how to write, most of us are taught the ‘rules’ – a sentence must express a complete thought, it needs a punctuation mark at the end of it, it should never start with ‘and’ or ‘but’, etc.

But once you’ve left school, you can leave these rules behind.

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On Writing (Pretty Neat)

If you’re wanting to get better at this business of typing words and hoping they make sense, a.k.a improve your writing, your first stop should be your local library. Turns out they’re not just refuges for those sweltering days when you need aircon; they’re filled with books too.

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Swallowing Our History (Matters Journal)

It’s estimated that there are over 6,500 native food species in Australia – how many have you tried? You’ll probably get a chance to sample more, with the popularity of indigenous foods making it likely more will appear in restaurant menus and supermarkets in the future.

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Dancing Through Life: Lindy Wills (Audrey Daybook)

Lynette ‘Lindy’ Wills is one of Australia’s most accomplished ballerinas, but her 19-year career wasn’t sparked by visions of sugarplums. “I didn’t start ballet with the usual reason, of skipping around wanting to be a fairy,” says Lindy.

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Aiming High: Equal Playing Field (Fernwood)

Laura Youngson is not the type of person to sit back and seethe. Annoyed that a women’s soccer team didn’t receive funding while the men’s team did, Laura established the Equal Playing Field initiative to promote women in sport. “That’s where the idea came from, to do something so outrageous and so ridiculously difficult that people would think, ‘you did that? that’s crazy!’,” she says. And as far as challenges go, playing soccer at the top of Mount Kilimanjaro is up there.

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Mysterious markings

In 1980 in America’s Bible Belt, a toddler named James Luke had tumours all over his body. An IV insertion caused a linear scar on his neck, while a tumour behind his left eye blinded him and another behind his right ear was biopsied. Twelve years later, James’ mother Kathy had given birth to two healthy children and was welcoming another son. As well as being born blind in his left eye, with a cyst behind his right ear, her newborn son had a linear birthmark on his neck.

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You’ve Got Meal: 3D Printed Food (Matters Journal)

Imagine pattering into the kitchen, flicking on the coffee maker and casually leaning over to fire up your personal 3D printer, which warms up and gets ready to whip you up a plate of eggs or pancakes. So far so Sci-Fi, right? In reality this is how the CSIRO think we’ll be making breakfast 13 years from now.

 

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We are not alone: close encounters of an Australian kind (Daily Care)

Many of us spend our days hunched over our phones, peering down. But before we became glued to technology, we looked up, and what did we see? Birds, clouds…and UFOs. Here are three of the most notable UFO sightings in Australian history.

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